Best Practices of Process Management: The Top Ten Principles (Part 9)

Roger T.  Burlton
Roger T. Burlton President and Managing Partner, Process Renewal Group Read Author Bio || Read All Articles by Roger T. Burlton

Years of successful and not-so-successful process management experience have led to a set of best practices -- a number of fundamental principles that must be honored in order to optimize returns to the company, the delivery of business results to customers, and to satisfy the needs of the organization's other stakeholders.  

In this series, I outline the ten principles that underlie the methods of business process operation and change.  In this column, I discuss the ninth principle.

Principle 9:  Business Change Is All About People

Human change isn't something you do; it's everything you do. 

Many steps in managing process change are there for no good reason other than decision support.  Intellectually, you could argue that many steps are unnecessary or a waste of time and effort.  Sadly, you are right, if you don't consider the human element.  Change initiatives are often used simply as ways of creating a document. 

Instead, you must see change initiatives as a vehicle of more encompassing transformation.  You aren't just converting technology, data, procedures, or organizations; you are converting people into enthusiastic supporters and participants.  This is one reason that you should encourage active participation in the analysis of existing processes.  This analysis fosters understanding and communication.

To do this, a number of factors become paramount.  In addition to your communications strategy, you must support changes with appropriate roles and responsibilities, organizational structures, empowerment within accountability, aligned performance incentives, and recognition as well as personal growth opportunities. 

During transition, the staff must feel that an appropriate level of trustworthy communication is happening.  They should feel a sense of contribution as a result of their participation.

References

[1]  Roger T. Burlton, "Best Practices of Process Management:   The Top Ten Principles (Part 1)," Business Rules Journal, Vol. 7, No. 1 (Jan. 2006), URL:  http://www.BRCommunity.com/a2006/b269.html  

[2]  Roger T. Burlton, "Best Practices of Process Management:   The Top Ten Principles (Part 2)," Business Rules Journal, Vol. 7, No. 2 (Feb. 2006), URL:  http://www.BRCommunity.com/a2006/b273.html  

[3]  Roger T. Burlton, "Best Practices of Process Management:   The Top Ten Principles (Part 3)," Business Rules Journal, Vol. 7, No. 3 (Mar. 2006), URL:  http://www.BRCommunity.com/a2006/b278.html  

[4]  Roger T. Burlton, "Best Practices of Process Management:   The Top Ten Principles (Part 4)," Business Rules Journal, Vol. 7, No. 4 (Apr. 2006), URL:  http://www.BRCommunity.com/a2006/b285.html  

[5]  Roger T. Burlton, "Best Practices of Process Management:   The Top Ten Principles (Part 5)," Business Rules Journal, Vol. 7, No. 5 (May 2006), URL:  http://www.BRCommunity.com/a2006/b291.html  

[6]  Roger T. Burlton, "Best Practices of Process Management:   The Top Ten Principles (Part 6)," Business Rules Journal, Vol. 7, No. 6 (June 2006), URL:  http://www.BRCommunity.com/a2006/b296.html  

[7]  Roger T. Burlton, "Best Practices of Process Management:   The Top Ten Principles (Part 7)," Business Rules Journal, Vol. 7, No. 7 (July 2006), URL:  http://www.BRCommunity.com/a2006/b302.html  

[8]  Roger T. Burlton, "Best Practices of Process Management:   The Top Ten Principles (Part 8)," Business Rules Journal, Vol. 7, No. 8 (August 2006), URL:  http://www.BRCommunity.com/a2006/b307.html  

# # #

Standard citation for this article:


citations icon
Roger T. Burlton , "Best Practices of Process Management: The Top Ten Principles (Part 9)" Business Rules Journal Vol. 7, No. 9, (Sep. 2006)
URL: http://www.brcommunity.com/a2006/b311.html

About our Contributor:


Roger  T. Burlton
Roger T. Burlton President and Managing Partner, Process Renewal Group

Roger is a respected pioneer in the introduction of innovative approaches for Business Management. He is a world leader in the field of Business Process Management, having authored one of the most read and followed books on the topic early in BPM's growth as well as the Business Process Manifesto. Roger's leadership is also witnessed by his position as chair of several of the most influential conferences each year on BPM and Business Architecture and by his role as chair of the BPTrends.com Advisory Board. The insights he brings to PRG's consulting clients are thoughtful and pragmatic.

Read All Articles by Roger T. Burlton

Online Interactive Training Series

In response to a great many requests, Business Rule Solutions now offers at-a-distance learning options. No travel, no backlogs, no hassles. Same great instructors, but with schedules, content and pricing designed to meet the special needs of busy professionals.